Step 4 A: Grading and Social Justice

 

South L.A. student finds a different world at Cal – LA Times

Read this article from The LA Times.  Take notes to collect textual evidence to support your response to:

What issues around traditional K-12 grading practices does this article raise?

In the comment section below, post your response to the above question including supporting textual evidence.

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1,381 thoughts on “Step 4 A: Grading and Social Justice

  1. San Fernando High - Mettlen says:

    As the article states, “The biggest of his burdens was schoolwork. At Jefferson, a long essay took a page and perfect grades came after an hour of study a night,” shows that the level of work at his high school didn’t prepare Kashawn for the level of work and studying required in a college of Berkley’s stature. Also, his teachers aren’t grading on a scale of standards mastery, but rather on completion of work, and therefor his GPA was overinflated. This are common problems that occur at schools where students don’t come prepared with the best backgrounds and support.

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  2. Andrea Smith says:

    Academia seems not to include aspects of living that challenge students everyday. In the article the author proposes that, “Academics are not who you are.” Student’s are anxious and stressed about grades and there are times students become depressed. I was glad to see that Kashawn is strong. Although, having to take a class again or a test all over again only to be averaged with other assignments is terribly surppressing. I beleive Kashawn’s experience is exactly what is wrong with traditional K-12 grading policies. They do not take into account the whole student and their abilities.

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  3. RHONDA HAKIMOVICH says:

    I empathize with Kashawn’s teachers. They were so proud of him. Kashawn was an anomaly in his educational setting; he was engaged in learning and strove to succeed. Unfortunately, Kashawn’s teachers did him a huge disservice by inflating his grades and ignoring the areas where he needed to improve. They should have helped him! This negligence led to Kashawn’s lack of preparedness for college.

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  4. “It was so rare to have a kid like Kashawn, especially an African American male, wanting that badly to go to college,” said Jeremy McDavid, a former Jefferson vice principal. “We got together as a staff and decided that this kid, we cannot let him down.” This quote to me shows good intentions by the staff, but when you then look below at the quote from the article about how unprepared he was to handle college level work you have to wonder about the standards for work set by the high school.
    The biggest of his burdens was schoolwork. At Jefferson, a long essay took a page and perfect grades came after an hour of study a night.
    At Cal, he was among the hardest workers in the dorm, but he could barely keep afloat.
    Seeking help, he went at least once a week to the office of his writing instructor, Verda Delp.
    The more she saw him, the more she worried. His writing often didn’t make sense. He struggled to comprehend the readings for her class and think critically about the text.
    As a teacher in a school where there are many students that are not passing their classes, it can be a real struggle to not grade on a curve and let the students set the bar often times low. This seems to be the case with his high school but I also know that after high school I tested into remedial English and math at pierce but I felt that I really didn’t do a lot in high school and my grades were ok and that if the grades were lower, then I would have risen to the occasion not because I had a desire by because I had a mother.

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  5. LETICIA CALLELA AUSTIN says:

    The problem with traditional grading practices that I saw in this Kashawn’s experience was that the grading system actually worked against him when he got into Cal. He was under the impression that his success at Jefferson High was adequate to get him into Cal Berkeley. However, his teachers were not giving him the best tools to prepare him for such a high-performing school because of the inconsistencies in their grading practices. Kashawn’s writing skills at any other institution would have warranted intervention. However, as stated in the article, the population that was proficient in English in his high school freshman class was only 13%. His determination and willingness to learn is what pushed many of his teachers to help him push through and attempt to get into Cal. Although their hearts were in the right place, if Kashawn had participated in some Tier 1 intervention within the English class, he would have had the tools to stay afloat his freshman year at Cal.

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  6. Irineo Yanez says:

    One of the main issues brought up in this article are the overall inconsistencies in the educational system. First of all, Kashawn thought he was prepared to go to university but it turned out that his writing were subpar. The point I picked up here was that even though he was an exemplary student at his high school, he lacked the skills to keep up in his writing course at the university level. This shows inconsistencies within the K-12 educational system because some students do enter university prepared in this area. Another issue based around inconstancies is the grading policies within the university. In one class, Kashawn was exceeding while he was struggling in the other. The grading policies of the two professors were obviously not the same when it came to writing assignments.

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  7. Alexandra Castro says:

    What issues around traditional K-12 grading practices does this article raise?
    In response to the article South L.A. student finds a different world at Cal by Kurt Streeter is that there is a difference of grading among schools. Kashawn Campbell graduated from Jefferson High where a full page essay and an hour of studying at night was a perfect grade. UC Berkeley demanded more of students in every subject. Kashawn had a lot of trouble writing, where his writing instructor had given a “No Pass” in his first and second essay. His writing often didn’t make sense. His instructor could have written constructive feedback for him to correct his paper and turned it in for a better grade. I believe that there needs to be a uniformity among grading among all schools.

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  8. Rasheda Young says:

    I think that multiple issues contribute to how Kashawn’s academic struggle at CalBerkeley. In terms of traditional grading practices, educators who tend to work in the inner city are bombarded with multiple intense issues all at once: school safety (or the lack thereof), violence (from the students, community, etc.), academic and developmental gaps in students, and so on. On page 2, the article mentions how the entire staff and community saw Kashawn as a bright star, and everyone wanted him to succeed, particularly since he was a student who was enthusiastic about school. His grades were more likely given for effort, willingness to obey classroom rules/norms, and for being wholehearted about the knowledge that he had acquired up to that point. I believe that had he had been given the tools and knowledge he needed prior to his enrollment at Cal Berkeley, he would not have struggled as much as he did. Inner-city teachers get overwhelmed with large class sizes of students who tend to be years behind grade level for various reasons, and if there is abuse, death, divorce, in addition to the poverty and neighborhood violence, then the attention to academic achievement is hampered. I think that our school districts need to be more serious about limiting class sizes for such students so that the educators who work there have a fighting chance to help educate their students. In addition, mental and emotional health providers must be at every school so that teachers have the opportunity to teach students who are mentally and emotionally open to education. Based on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, every person must have their basic needs met in order to be able to be open to anything of a higher level.

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  9. Felipa Cepeda says:

    “It was so rare to have a kid like Kashawn,
    especially an African American male, wanting
    that badly to go to college,” said Jeremy
    McDavid, a former Jefferson vice principal.
    “We got together as a staff and decided that
    this kid, we cannot let him down.”

    This quote is quite upsetting to me. As a school, they decided to basically pad this student’s grades because he had such a drive to attend college. They did not prepare him for a rigorous academic college. They gave him a misguided perception of his knowledge and abilities, and set him up to fail.

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  10. Loyda Ramos says:

    What issues around traditional K-12 grading practices does this article raise?

    I love reading this article in that Kashawan’s wonderful heart, circumstances, and drive really shined through at his high school in South LA. So much, that his teachers rooted for him and even made him the big fish in a small pond. Unfortunately, problems arose when Kashawan realized he was no longer the bigger fish.

    The problem this article arose and resonate highly is that no matter how much drive an individual has to succeed, the rigor in our instruction holds such heavy weight. I felt even more pressure as an educator to be more rigorous in my instruction in writing, mathematics and so forth. I agree Kashawan’s thinking that academics do not define you because at the end of the day, our drive and ambition can always overcome if we do not give up. However, what about to those who aren’t as strong in their growth mindset and just give up?

    I admit that there has been a time when I have been tempted to skew grades to that student that truly puts so much effort in their learning and yet does not pass an assessment. One method I am currently using to shy away from this is creating rubrics and sharing them with my students. In this way they understand how I am giving out grades and what to expect. This also helps me to stay accountable when grading to not act out of compassion as Kashawn’s teachers did. I don’t want to in any way rebuke his teachers nor their grading practice, but reading this article broke my heart. The ending of the article is promising in a way that is NOT ideal. Sure, he will be a sophomore but with a GPA of 2.0! What’s to say he won’t continue to struggle?

    One solution for us educators is to always remember to keep high expectations and deliver an instruction that is rigorous to make them college and career ready.

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  11. M. Seestedt says:

    The issue with traditional K-12 grading that this article raises is that grading practices are not the same at all schools and are subjective. This can impact how successful a student can be at the college level. Another issue, is if the curriculum or rigor at schools is preparing our students for college.

    One issue we can see is how grading practices differ in schools. In high school Kashawn, a straight A student, “was named the prom king, the most likely to succeed, the senior class salutatorian. He was accepted to UC Berkeley, one of the nation’s most renowned public universities.” However, when at UC Berkeley he had a 1.7 GPA and was in danger of flunking out. However, Keshawn’s roommate, Spencer, who similar to Kashawn, was raised in a tough L.A. neighborhood by a single mom, gone to struggling public schools, and received straight A’s was “finishing the first semester with a 3.8 GPA.

    From the article it seemed like his teachers gave him good grades because they wanted him to go to college. Because of this Kashawn was unprepared for his failure in college.

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  12. laurenvaron says:

    One of the main issues that this article speaks to is the subjectivity of grading. Kashawn’s peers and teachers were rooting for him and the staff at his school got together and decided that they could not let him down. However, the article showed that despite his school and teachers rooting for him, it was not enough to help him succeed in college. Kashawn stood out at his school but compared to other students attending Berkeley, he was not equipped with the skills necessary. It was clear that his growth mindset and determination to succeed wasn’t enough to compensate for his lack of skills needed to pass the introductory college courses. The article also points out the difficulty of grading students fairly and accurately across schools. A 4.06 GPA from his school is not the same as the same GPA at a different school. How can we prepare students for college when our expectations are different? An essay at Jefferson is a page and perfect grades come after an hour of student a night but at another school an essay might be required to be 10 pages and students are studying several hours each night. How do we hold all students accountable for the same work and have high expectations for all students? I imagine it is very difficulty for teachers to do this at Jefferson when 13% of its students were judged to be proficient in English, less then 1% in math. But lowering expectations and standards for students is only setting them up for failure later on.

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  13. Noe Solares says:

    It was very interesting to note in the article about how school administrators have low expectations of black youth. The school administrator said that it was rare to see a black student “wanting” so badly to go to college. So the staff agreed to make sure Kashawn went to college, but instead of focusing on making sure he improved the skills necessary to be successful in college, they focused on making sure he had the grades to make it to college, and that was a disservice to him.

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  14. STEPHANIE MIRANDA says:

    What issues around traditional K-12 grading practices does this article raise?

    This raised many issues for me for K-12 grading practices. The article highlights how a 4.06 GPA from one school does not necessarily compare to a 4.06 GPA in a different school, and this was shown by how unprepared he was for college. His drive and spirit were nothing short of remarkable. It was heartbreaking to read about his mom being forced to work so much of his early childhood and to have his caregiver be capable of warmth and love, but not being able to build a strong literacy background. I think his school was so passionate about his drive that his grades were inflated a bit, perhaps because some teachers grade in comparison to the cohort of students in the class, rather than on mastery of the learning targets.

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  15. Rick G says:

    While this poignant article powerfully shows the disparity socio economic conditions can have on student, it is is indisputable that at the given moment in time Keshawn was not as well prepared as his roommate. Is this fair or acceptable? Of course not. In order to succeed in our world, Keshawn will have to make up his college preparedness deficiencies. Education can make a difference but it will be Keshawn’s determination and perservence that makes the difference. And it seems to me that what public ed offers is the opportunity and guidance for him others like him to succr.

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  16. Rick G says:

    While this poignant article powerfully shows the disparity socio economic conditions can have on student, it is is indisputable that at the given moment in time Keshawn was not as well prepared as his roommate. Is this fair or acceptable? Of course not. In order to succeed in our world, Keshawn will have to make up his college preparedness deficiencies. Education can make a difference but it will be Keshawn’s determination and perservence that makes the difference.

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  17. Angelique McNiff says:

    This article points out the difficulties faced by students who at the High School level seem to primarily be graded on turn-in ratio combined with assignments scaled-down in complexity to meet the needs of the lower than average population. As the students at Kashawn’s school do not have a strong skill base, the teachers were thrilled to see a student like Kashawn and tried to do all they could to help him find success; however, the expectation for him was still vastly lower than that of students and higher performing schools – thus creating the divide he felt at Berkeley. The combination of the skills divide and the lack of students of the same race, along with some personal issues with himself and at home, all created a tsunami that few could overcome. The article mentions another student of the same race but with higher skills and fewer emotional and economic struggles who found great success and acted as a mentor to Kayshawn; this, combined with the teacher who was willing to give incompletes in the course to force Kayshawn to improve his skills to meet the level of the course, indicates that students need mentors to help them find success. Kayshawn’s friend and teacher, along with a strong drive, help him to succeed. If these elements are missing, the students with lower skills are faced with insurmountable obstacles leading to failure; thus, the article suggests that skills need to be the primary focus at all levels.

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  18. Jenny Burman says:

    This article highlights the importance of explicitly teaching writing and growth mindset in the classroom. Keshawn was a “straight A” student in high school but his college writing instructor said, “His writing often didn’t make sense.” There are so many skills that teachers have to choose from when they select objectives. Kashawn could have experienced less stress in his first year at Berkeley if he had the skills to explain himself in writing. Additionally when Kashawn struggled with writing, “He couldn’t believe that he needed more skills.” This shows that Kashawn needed more skills. It’s his disbelief that stands like a boulder between him and his success. If Kashawn had been steeped in opportunities to fail in order to learn, then this challenge might be welcomed.

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  19. Sophia Kang says:

    What issues around traditional K-12 grading practices does this article raise?

    This article raises the issue of how a GPA is not reflective of a student’s college readiness level. Although Kashawn had received stellar grades in high school, it seems that the grades were based on his completion of work. According to a professor at Cal, Kashawn “struggled to comprehend the readings for her class and think critically about the text.” The professor continues to comment about his paper, which “would be full of words he thought were academic, writing the way he
    thought a college student should write, using big words he didn’t have command of.” This reveals something about the quality of education that Kashawn received. Although he really badly wanted to do well, his traditional K-12 education had failed to provide the feedback and classroom practice he needed in order to be college ready.

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  20. Jill Hagan says:

    This article brings up a lot of issues around traditional K-12 grading practices. There can be grade inflation at some schools, such as what was seen at Kashawn’s school. He had a 4.06, the second best in the senior class. But He only had a 1.7 at Berkeley.

    He had poor skills, even though they were the best at his school. It said that “his writing often didn’t make sense. He struggled to comprehend the readings for her class and think critically about the text.”

    Moreover, “one of his essays had been good enough to receive passing grades. Still, instead of failing him, she gave a reprieve: His report card would show an ‘In Progress.’”

    This brings up a lot of questions as a teacher. If I have students with low skills, and they are not at grade level, do they continue to get low grades? How do we keep them inspired and motivated if they continue to get Cs and Ds? Yes, we have to build up their skills but many of our students come in with low skills and some are not literate in their native languages, and they are definitely below grade level when they come to our classes. My godson and goddaughter must read four novels over the summer during middle school at their private schools. Some students only read one novel each semester, or even one novel a year, during middle school and high school. So these students will received very different educations by the time they graduate from high school. There are no easy answers for me.

    Keshawn had such a growth mindset and great support from his friend and tutors. I wish that all students could have that much support at all schools.

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  21. Brenda Casanova says:

    Something that stood out to me in this article was that the principal of Kashawn’s high school stated that, “it was so rare to have a kid like Kashawn especially an African American male, wanting that badly to go to college…we got together as a staff and decided that this kid, we cannot let him down.” This quote seemed problematic to me because it presents the students at Jefferson High School as students that didn’t want to attend college as badly as Kashawn. The principal makes it seem as though the administration got together to not let this one student down, but I wonder if they had that same drive and motivation to help the other students get into college. This article makes me think about the concept of believing in the full potential of every student and what effect that can have on a student population when they are around administrators and staff that truly believe in them. Another issue that this quote brought up for me, was that the staff might have inflated Kashawn’s grades just to make sure they didn’t’t “let him down” and got him into college. The article highlights how much difficulty Kashawn had with his writing. How could his high school teachers not have noticed this? The article also highlights that although Kashawn and Spencer were both African-American males, they had drastically different upbringings and learning environments. This in turn really affected the way they performed at Berkeley. Although Kashawn had tried immensely to do well at Berkeley, he was not as prepared for college as some of his classmates. How are we preparing students for the rigor of college while at the same time providing them with culturally relevant material that will engage them in the classroom?

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  22. AmberK says:

    As we continue to discuss the relevance of traditional grading, we recognize how subjective grading can be. Kashawn’s teachers recognized how rare it was to have a black male express such a passion for going to college and knew that together as a staff and a community that they could not let him down. In the end, he wasn’t prepared for his college experience. The factors that could only stand out to me is that the rigor and challenges were not up to par at his highschool compared to other schools. This became evident when Kashawn’s roommate, having gone to a non inner city school, was better prepared for college than Kashawn. Thankfully Kashawn had something to prove and made strides, but the current grading system failed him.

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  23. Michael Dang says:

    Here are two quotes that contrast the different experiences that Kashawn and his best friend Spencer had growing up in LA in relation to their caregivers. “Sylvia didn’t read many magazines, newspapers or books. Only rarely did she take Kashawn outside their neighborhood.” “As much as they had in common, they were also different. Spencer’s mother, a medical administrator, had graduated from UCLA and exposed her only child to art, politics, literature and the world beyond Inglewood. ” Although both boys grew up in areas of LA with similar SES, their access to resources was not equitable. And so, when we adhere to traditional grading practices, we allow for a lot of subjectivity to do a disservice to our students by misrepresenting their grades with their understanding. An equitable education means that no matter what circumstances and resources that a student has access to growing up, their teachers do their best to help them achieve the same level of understanding as a kid with more privileges in a Beverly Hills neighborhood. By doing MLG, teachers will be able to better understand where each student’s understanding is at and respond with support and intervention appropriately.

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  24. S Duran says:

    “His writing often didn’t make sense. He struggled to comprehend the readings for her class and think critically about the text.” From this article we can assume that his academic preparation was mediocre, and that there might have been grade inflation. When we, as educators lower our expectations, and keep lowering our percent scale “to help out” our needed students, we will keep reading about it. We need to change the way we grade our student’s assignments, and it should be based on progress – mastery skills, and not based on good behavior.

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  25. Sonya Kinsey says:

    According to the article, I believe this article raises at least three very important issues. First, it raises the issue of how grading practices are done. Kashawn received a 4.06 grade point average at Jefferson High School, but received a 1.7 grade point average at UC Berkeley. Second, it raises the issue of the quality of the teaching/learning experience. Third, it raises the issue of does exposure to outside learning/factors help prepare you for a positive college experience. In the article, his roommate, Spencer, was also from a tough neighborhood, received straight A’s, and was exposed to outside learning/factors, such as art, politics, literature, and white boy scout troops.

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  26. Susan Enman says:

    Read this article from The LA Times. Take notes to collect textual evidence to support your response to:What issues around traditional K-12 grading practices does this article raise?
    Kashawn is an example we see time and time again of a performance based grading system to fulfill the 100pt scale. More than likely, the majority of his grade was based upon behavior and productivity. As a result, he found himself unable to meet the expectations of a collegiate environment which only graded based on academics. He was particularly challenged in the area of writing.

    This article also speaks to the importance of establishing a growth mindset. Kashawn survived because of it. He was consistently seeking out help and tutoring and did not give up.He wound up graduating with a 4.0 because of it.

    This is always my fear with giving good grades to kids just because they show up, do their work, however poor it may be and are well behaved. They may get to college, but can they stay there?

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  27. Stefnie Evans says:

    The issues raised in this article around K12 grading, for me center on preparing students to be able to compete at the college level. On page 8 of the article, Kashawn told a most telling part of his high school learning experience: “At Jefferson, a long essay took a page and perfect grades came after an hour of study a night.” The result of a student with a 4.06 GPA, who has not been required to write a paper longer than a page says to me that he was never required to research or integrate complex ideas and form conclusions based on evidence.

    The writers commentary on Kashawn completed this thought comparing his high school experience to that of college. “At Cal, he was among the hardest workers in the dorm, but he could barely keep afloat.”

    Kashawn had challenges of culture, which he addressed by choosing an accommodating dorm living situation, and connecting with other students who looked like him. The biggest obstacle was not being challenged in a way that provided him with transferrable skills beyond his inner city high school.

    I also believe that one thing that the academic success gave to Kashawn, was a grit to succeed. The teachers clearly wrapped around him and his desire to go to college, and that was the power he drew from to stay on the path to become a learner.

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  28. Shauna Segal says:

    The story of Kashawn and Spencer reminded me of an experience I had many years ago as a student at UCLA. Specifically, while working as a student tutor in the Academic Advancement Program, I worked with a student on answering the questions at the end of a selection in the Norton Anthology of English Literature. She was struggling to understand the passage so we pulled out a dictionary and looked up every word in the selection that she did not recognize, which was a lot of words. Afterwards she was able to answer all the questions at the end. I was very excited at her progress, but she just looked at me and said, “I was a straight-A student in high school. They lied to me.” That really resonated with me because I realized her teachers should have been providing opportunities to work at her challenge level and access work that would better prepare her for college as was the case with Kashawn. In the end, however, I am so happy Kashawn had a growth mindset and didn’t give up, and I think that having a friend like Spencer was incredibly important as was support from faculty and psychological services at school. I would be really interested in updates on Kashawn because he is a great role model for his persistence.

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  29. C Bakewell says:

    This article illustrates that one of the issues of K-12 grading practices is that grading is not at all standard among schools. The article states, “Because of a statewide program to attract top students from every public California high school, a spot at a UC system campus waited for him.”
    The case of Kashawn Campbell arriving at a university like Berkeley and having difficulty is probably more common than anyone thinks. Apparently, he hadn’t received feedback to let him know that his writing skills needed improvement before he tackled college. There are many other factors in this story to consider, but I feel so bad for this enthusiastic student who was faced with too much for him to take on, and without enough support.

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  30. Lucrecia Apanay says:

    This article sheds light on the disparity of grades depending on where one teaches and how flowed the system is if we don’t grade on standards or skills learned.

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  31. What issues around traditional K-12 grading practices does this article raise?
    It raises the issue of our lack of rigor and our hesitance to challenge our students academically even when it means confrontations with parents!

    The quote below, in the article, speaks volumes. Even though high school is a critical period of mental and emotional development, its important that we as teachers help guide our young students through failure and adversity. This will hopefully provide them with proper coping skills.

    ‘He had never felt this kind of failure, nor felt this insecure.”

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  32. Shareen Gochoel says:

    In the article, South LA student finds a different world at Cal, Kashawn Campbell became a straight-A student at Jefferson High where a long essay took a page and perfect grades came after an hour of study at night. Meanwhile, at Cal, his writing instructor said his writing often didn’t make sense, and that he struggled to comprehend the readings for her class and think critically about the text. If the grading practices at the High School aren’t as rigorous with college life it sets a student up for failure.

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  33. Allison Conant says:

    I think this is an issue that many teachers at my school are concerned about. I’m concerned about. Students arrive at our high school reading, doing math well below grade level for the most part. Conversely, some students, like Keshawn are the stars. They have great attitudes, great work habits, are willing to get tutoring, and some teachers are just so relieved to get a willing student — the general bar slides. It’s rough. I sympathize with the teachers at Keshawn’s school, I truly do, but we are clearly not setting kids like this up for success. Keshawn was dealing with depression and had few resources — he was underserved. Can this grading system change things for kids like this? Maybe? I don’t know. It seems like one tool in the arsenal for sure.

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  34. ISELA DE LA TORRE says:

    Kashawn said, “It’s like a different planet here.” We need to help so that the college experience is not so threatening for our kids. I identify so much with Kashawn;s story. It is my story, too. I felt like dropping out of the university every day that I was there. It was a very difficult time in my life, but somehow I mustered through it. I still don’t know how I survived it.

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  35. ISELA DE LA TORRE says:

    I think Kashawn’s story is a common one that occurs with many students who are coming from inner city schools. His story raises the issue that current grading policies are not an accurate measure of the learning because they are so subjective. Consequently, when students like Kashawn are trying to make a path in academia for themselves, they find they are not equipped with the skills that are necessary to be successful for this higher learning. They enter a world of the academic elite that stretches beyond the borders of the inner city into places where students have had access to more resources and so many more experiences and privileges. He does not have that same advantage, so because of this, he deserves to be supported before entering that more challenging environment, and constructive grading could have perhaps made the difference for him. We need to make it our mission as educators to support those students like Kashawn in ways that will lead to their success once they enter that new world of higher education. Changing how we grade is just a start.

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