Step 1 A: Reflect on Your Grading

 

In the comment section below, take a moment to reflect upon and answer the two questions below:

1.  Where/When did you first learn how to determine student final grades?

2.  What support did you receive in that process?

Please also read through a sampling of your colleagues’ comments and reflect upon any similarities to or differences from your own experiences.

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1,410 thoughts on “Step 1 A: Reflect on Your Grading

  1. Cris says:

    In honest truth, I received no help when it came to grading, I just did what my other colleagues were doing at the time. I then transitioned on to eazy grader system using percentages, and then on to their test scores and averaging theml

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  2. Mor says:

    When I started teaching I had many questions on how to grade my students. I got no answers, no support. I followed the way my teachers graded me when I was in school. I asked some experience teachers at my school and they were able to give me some ideas on how to grade my students.

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  3. Harmony072004 says:

    On my first year teaching I used whatever I knew about grading. I based my grades on the 100% scale and rubrics, especially for writing. I didn’t receive any support from administrators nor a mentor teacher since that was not usual when I started teaching.

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  4. Harmony20004 says:

    I first learned how to determine my students’ final grades during my first teaching assignment. I taught Kindergarten and I asked my room partner, who had taught in the morning, when Kindergarten was half day and not full day, how she determined her students’ final grades. She told me that I should look at the assessments I had given my students for each standard I taught and average out the grade to determine the final grade.
    I received very little support in this process.

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  5. JOSE JARQUIN says:

    1. I learned how to determine students’ grades by observing other teachers.

    2. I don’t remember receiving any support during this process.

    Like

  6. Monica Esparz says:

    I didn’t receive formal training on how to determine final grades for report cards or progress reports. When I felt unsure, I would ask a colleague if my reasoning justified a grade given.

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  7. Harmony mhc says:

    I first learned how to determine student final grades from my mentor teacher. I did not receive any other support in this process.

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  8. Katheryne Martinez says:

    I learned how to determine grades from how the teachers would grade me in High School. Tests and projects were usually 100 points. I only received the software and I had to figure out how to put the percentages, points and everything else.

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  9. Veronica Lopez says:

    I learned how to determine student grades through my mentor teacher my first year of teaching. I reached out to my mentor with questions but I thought it was easier just to copy her style of grading and then I could modify later in the years.

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  10. Lyda Lara says:

    The first time I learn to calculate student grades was at one of my credential program classes, but it was very general and it really didn’t cover my subject matter since it was for all credentialed teacher candidates.
    I don’t recall any support or feedback. I got more out of my master teacher.

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  11. Harmony 1 says:

    When I started teaching, there was no formal way of determining grades. I just used assessments, student work and observations to determine grades.

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  12. Reina Diaz says:

    I did not get any formal training, however, I did to writing samples calibration to get a better understanding of grading student in writing.

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  13. Theresa Corsaro says:

    I talked to my room partner and asked how she graded. I remember scoring writing samples together, but no other calibration. The ELD portfolios gave some instruction on grading

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  14. Lucy Terarakelyan says:

    I remember that as a novice teacher I had to figure out my own grading method that would be as accurate as possible, and I also noticed that my colleagues were doing the same – they had their own methods of calculating the grades.

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  15. J Johnson says:

    I learned how to determine final grades from colleagues,just meeting with them picking their brains gathering information. Then just attending workshops and the internet.

    I received support from teacher that have lots of experience, also my principle showed me lots of support as well.

    Like

  16. Lela Rondeau says:

    I don’t remember any specific guidance when it came to grading. It was confusing for me because as a new Special Educator, I was not sure what I was supposed to grade my students on- progress? Grade level achievement? Like others above, I was given some parameters for grades, such as ensuring a set number of graded assignments per week.

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  17. Julia Bugyik says:

    I first learned ow to assign grades my first day in the classroom and by looking at other teacher’s grade books and syllabi.

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  18. María D. Soto says:

    My mentor teacher shared her grading scale and a grading program with me. A couple of English teachers helped me and guided me. My first year was a learning experience, but I was fortunate to have the help of other experienced teachers in my learning journey.

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  19. Enrique Hueyopa says:

    I learned to grade from my master teacher. I do not remember the software I used but the program averaged all scores and gave a final score.

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  20. Latosha Guy says:

    It has been quite a long time, but I do remember substantial attention dedicated to assessing student writing using portfolios. Part of the point was to assess students growth and performance on specified skills and over a specified amount of time. Truthfully, I don’t know how or why I got a way from Portfolios–perhaps of the gradual increase of standardized testing or perhaps the gradual increase in importance of teaching non-fiction. In the past, PD and informal conversations with colleagues focused on allowing students multiple opportunities to demonstrate learning and then mastery, although in today’s competitive culture, more of grading seems to be a one shot deal.

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  21. Mark Kavanagh says:

    When I started teaching in Brooklyn, I was left entirely on my own when it came to grading. I queried a number of teachers and gathered many good ideas, all quite different. In Adult Ed, individualized instruction offered explicit guidelines for grading tied to competency-based education.

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  22. Helen Cook says:

    1. Where/When did you first learn how to determine student final grades?
    I’ve learned to grade students’ works during my student teaching sessions. Not only did I learn to grade students’ works with rubrics and various scales, I’ve also learned to grade in a manner that students are comprehensible of the assessment outcomes, too. Timing and pacing has been a challenge, but I was able to see the realistic ways in returns and methods of grading as well.

    2. What support did you receive in that process?
    I received the supports like sample gradings, practice, modeling, and general rubric scales to compare for each class or grade of students.

    Like

  23. Yesenia Medrano says:

    1. Where/When did you first learn how to determine student final grades?
    I first learned to determine final grades during my first year of teaching. I was given a program called Easy Grade Pro to use.

    2. What support did you receive in that process?
    I didn’t get any support. I figured it out on my own.

    Like

  24. I learned to determine students’ final grades during my first semester as a teacher. My department chair showed me how she graded her students on a roster where points were entered using a black or blue ink pen. Then using a calculator, those points were added to figure out a percentage. My department chair was helpful enough to check my final grades and ask me questions as to why my students deserved the grade I gave them.

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  25. Steve Lopez says:

    1. Where/When did you first learn how to determine student final grades?
    As a teacher assistant, I learned how to determine final grades from the teachers I was assigned to. It was pretty much the way I had been graded as a student, which used percentages. This was reinforced my first few years as a teacher, first with traditional grade books, and later with electronic grade books.

    2. What support did you receive in that process? No real “support,” but more like expectations-anyone who didn’t know how to “do” a roll/grade book was guided in the process of adding a minimum of 2 assignments per week.

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  26. Lalaine Tan says:

    After the District shifted to scoring writing assignments with rubrics did I begin to think about a more effective and reliable way of giving students final grades using multiple measures and rubrics. I received support from the Literacy Division.

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  27. Andrew Perez says:

    Early on during my teacher credentialing program, there was a portfolio assignment entitled “A picture say’s 1000 words”, the portfolio required a video presentation of yourself teaching a lesson… Being one with limited resources, I came across a professional development course that offered a video taping of my teaching and critical analysis of my teaching style, preparedness and assessment of the lesson. A rubric was developed and the lesson products where analyzed for accuracy in the grading. .

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  28. O Rodriguez says:

    When I started teaching, the department chair shared the departments grading scale and categories (weighted grades) and shared a grading program with me. My colleagues helped me set up the grading program, which computed final grades for me.

    Like

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