Step 4 B: Assessment and Mindsets

Weblink: www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNeNZD_IQcM

 

Reflect on your answer to the poll in the comment section below. Read through a sampling of your colleagues’ responses to learn about other peoples’ experiences with students correcting tests.

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908 thoughts on “Step 4 B: Assessment and Mindsets

  1. MSoto says:

    Yes, students are more concern with their grade and not about learning. Students always ask how much an assignment is worth? and If an assignment or test will have a great impact on their grade. Our education system place a great value on grades and not on learning. For this reason, parents only care about grades and not about learning. There are students who are behind in reading and math and even if they go up a couple of levels, their teachers are not recognized as efficient teachers, if they do not pass certain controlled tests or if they do not have a passing grade in the class.

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  2. Hernesto Meza says:

    Oh the struggle of making students really understand that their mistakes will really help them learn. Students typically want to know if they got something right, they want quick approval and know that they are right. However, as educators we need to constantly teach our students what went wrong and how to fix it. This idea of helping them with going through their mistakes will teach them more than simply telling them something is wrong. Like the video states the student who got it wrong and has a growth mindset will look for the mistake but other students with a fixed mindset might be ok just with its wrong. In addition, I have noticed that when students know something is wrong and it is not explained to them they rapidly shut down and give up.

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  3. When a person hears they did something “wrong,” this alone causes many people to “check out.” It’s like a defence or protection from pain or self hurt. I never thought of this as a mindset that is fixed. Perhaps if we don’t tell the students that they answered wrong, or gave them their score, maybe give them the answer and let them form the question…like Jeopardy.

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  4. Mark LInley says:

    People with growth mindsets focus on learning, not just performance. For example, the video presented the results of an experiment where subjects were given a trivia quiz and were then given a performance assessment of how well they did on the test. The study found that after subjects were given the results of their assessment, those with fixed mindsets “tuned out”. They were only interested on how they performed. Those with growth mindsets however were interested in the answers themselves and so on a subsequent pop quiz they performed better. These same results have been replicated elsewhere. People with growth mindsets have higher achievement.

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  5. Mich says:

    I agreed with the result of the poll. I observe most students only care about whether they got something correct or not. Also, they seem to only be concerned about their grade, not as much on whether they’re learning something valuable. I wouldn’t say that I have a growth mindset, necessarily, however, I do like to know the correct answer to a question I missed if I’m in a class. I also like to know how it could’ve been better…like what I missed.

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  6. D. Gonzalez says:

    Not sure if this happens more often in math classes than say English, but students really only seem to care for the score and how that affects their overall grade. They always have that common question, if I do badly on the test, is it going to lower my grade? Therefore, very few times do they ask for an explanation, unless there was a mistake and they want to make sure they got credit for their work.

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  7. Harmony4681 says:

    My students always want to know how they did on a test. They want to know what answers they got right and what answers they got wrong. I usually meet with individually because if a student didn’t well on a test, I don’t like to announce it to the whole class. If students did well, I don’t want those students who didn’t de well to feel bad. The students usually get embarrassed or upset. Students respond well when I tell them the areas of strength and areas of needs after I have analyzed their test. I have noticed that when I explain to them that there is time to improve, they are open to the idea of listening. We discuss how they can improve. I also explain the purpose of constructive feedback. When you explain to students that the intent of feedback is to help them improve and not to criticize or judge them, they more receptive to listening with less resistance.

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  8. Mor says:

    What I have notice with my students is that they want to know if they got an answer right or wrong.
    Some of my students do ask me, why did I get this answer wrong? They want an explanation why their answer was wrong. There are some students that are willing to learn from their mistakes and not to make the same mistake in the next test.

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  9. Harmony Carroll says:

    I think most students do want to understand how they can improve their performance, especially when they are very young. As students age, negative school experiences and relationships with teachers, might impact how they views their abilities. I wonder if any of the students in the study of growth verses fixed mindset viewed themselves as unable to learn because of what a teacher or parent said to them?

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  10. Harmony072004 says:

    Based on my experience, most students want to know if they got an answer right or wrong instead of why they got it wrong. I believe our job is to spark their interest in questions that were wrong and think about what would have make them correct. If we did that, they would learn what their mistakes were and they would make sure not to make the same mistake the next time they see a similar question. This practice will encourage growth mindset since it gill give them the opportunity to learn from their mistakes.

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  11. According to the video students with a fixed mindset wanted to look at the test where people did worse so they can feel better about themselves. In contrast, students with a growth mindset were more interested in doing better by looking at those tests who scored higher. In my experience, most elementary level students just want to know if they passed or not. They are mostly concerned with their overall grade. Rarely do I hear a student question their grade nor want to know why they got an answer incorrect. I have noticed students will tune out after the answers are being given and/or when I am going over the test. It’s unfortunate that students do not focus on the learning experience.

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  12. Harmony mhc says:

    I thought that most students would want to know how to answer a question they got wrong correctly so that they could learn from their mistakes. I was surprised by the results of the poll which shows that most people believe students just want to know whether they got a question right or wrong.

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  13. Harmony14 says:

    Unfortunately, my experience has been that most students are only interested in knowing if they got a question right or wrong instead of figuring out why it’s right or why it isn’t correct. It seems that students are not necessarily interested in understanding or analyzing why their answers were right or wrong.

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  14. Harmony Figueroa says:

    I have noticed that the majority of students, if not all, only want to know whether they got a question right or wrong. instead of go back to analyze their incorrect answers and see where they can improve.

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  15. msmartinez says:

    I was not at all surprised at the outcome of the poll. Most students are only eager to know whether they got the right or wrong answers on a test. I also think that if students were told beforehand that if they wished to do better on a test, they would have the opportunity to do so on a similar test and, would welcome the opportunity to know how to answer questions they got wrong to succeed the next time.

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  16. armando sanchez says:

    It seems that many answered that most students simply want to know the answer, as did I. I believe that goes back to the instant gratification, where they want satisfaction then and there; instantly. As a teacher, I tell my students that i want an explanation, the answer is great, but your explanation means so much more than just filling in a bubble or writing down a number.

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  17. Catherine says:

    I agreed with the majority of the respondents that most students only want to know whether they got a question right or wrong. I think most parents are also only interested in how their child scored on the test. Most times, the test ends with the score and students don’t go back to analyze their incorrect answers.

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  18. Rachel says:

    I agree with Elana, where students are too focused on knowing if they go the right answer and asking who they out performed (in order to get self achievement). We as educators have created learning environments were we are enabling the fixed mindset in our students, instead of the growth mindset. With students learning why and asking questions on why they got questions wrong we are focusing on the growth rather than the acceptance of not performing well.

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  19. Lin says:

    We actually designed some of the rational for students’ answer choices when they took the assessment, and we specifically told our students the explanation why they choose the answer choice will weigh the same points. When we collected the answer sheet, we found very few students actually explained his/her rationality, majority of the students just left it blank. Our students just don’t know how to explain or do care how they get the right answers.

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  20. Lyda Lara says:

    It is unfortunate that students only care about getting it right, but don’t want to know the correct answer if they got it wrong. I also think it is the culture we have created of not reflecting from the past.

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  21. Katheryne Martinez says:

    According to the poll, Most students only want to know whether they got a question right or wrong. Their success in the class is based on the amount of points they get. Nor the teachers or the students focus on the learning experience. If we focus on the learning process as part of the curriculum, we will be able to guide the students to a more progressive thinking process.

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  22. Veronica Lopez says:

    Most students want to know if they got a question correct or incorrect rather then how to answer the question in the future because the skill or content they learned might not be tested again.

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  23. Helen Cook says:

    Reflect on your answer to the poll in the comment section below. Read through a sampling of your colleagues’ responses to learn about other peoples’ experiences with students correcting tests.

    I think most students, at least by the end of a rigorous exam or assessment, want to learn about what they’ve struggles through in learning processes. Immediately after the assessment and results reviews are the pivotal times for students to be motivated to learn and grow on what they seemingly have been lacking.

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  24. Elena Macias says:

    It makes sense that most students who are simply grade driven might shut down after being told they got an answer wrong because they have the idea that there’s no point on knowing the right answer now since they already failed the test. But if we instill a love for learning and multiple opportunities for students to assess, then we will begin to see more students driven to know the right answer even after failing the first time since they know they’ll be another opportunity to succeed.

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